Privacy Policy

This privacy policy has been compiled to better serve those who are concerned with how their ‘Personally identifiable information’ (PII) is being used online. PII, as used in US privacy law and information security, is information that can be used on its own or with other information to identify, contact, or locate a single person, or to identify an individual in context. Please read our privacy policy carefully to get a clear understanding of how we collect, use, protect or otherwise handle your Personally Identifiable Information in accordance with our website.

What personal information do we collect from the people that visit our blog, website or app?

When ordering or registering on our site, as appropriate, you may be asked to enter your name, email address, mailing address, phone number or other details to help you with your experience.

When do we collect information?

We collect information from you when you register on our site, subscribe to a newsletter, fill out a form or enter information on our site.

How do we use your information?

We may use the information we collect from you when you register, make a purchase, sign up for our newsletter, respond to a survey or marketing communication, surf the website, or use certain other site features in the following ways:

  • To administer a contest, promotion, survey or other site feature.
  • To ask for ratings and reviews of services or products
  • To follow up with them after correspondence (live chat, email or phone inquiries)
How do we protect visitor information?

Our website is scanned on a regular basis for security holes and known vulnerabilities in order to make your visit to our site as safe as possible.

We use regular Malware Scanning.

Your personal information is contained behind secured networks and is only accessible by a limited number of persons who have special access rights to such systems, and are required to keep the information confidential. In addition, all sensitive/credit information you supply is encrypted via Secure Socket Layer (SSL) technology.

We implement a variety of security measures when a user enters, submits, or accesses their information to maintain the safety of your personal information.

All transactions are processed through a gateway provider and are not stored or processed on our servers.

Do we use ‘cookies’?

Yes. Cookies are small files that a site or its service provider transfers to your computer’s hard drive through your Web browser (if you allow) that enables the site’s or service provider’s systems to recognize your browser and capture and remember certain information. For instance, we use cookies to help us remember and process the items in your shopping cart. They are also used to help us understand your preferences based on previous or current site activity, which enables us to provide you with improved services. We also use cookies to help us compile aggregate data about site traffic and site interaction so that we can offer better site experiences and tools in the future.

We use cookies to:
  • Compile aggregate data about site traffic and site interactions in order to offer better site experiences and tools in the future. We may also use trusted third-party services that track this information on our behalf.

You can choose to have your computer warn you each time a cookie is being sent, or you can choose to turn off all cookies. You do this through your browser (like Internet Explorer) settings. Each browser is a little different, so look at your browser’s Help menu to learn the correct way to modify your cookies.

If you disable cookies off, some features will be disabled It won’t affect the user’s experience that make your site experience more efficient and some of our services will not function properly.

However, you can still place orders.

Third-party disclosure

We do not sell, trade, or otherwise transfer to outside parties your personally identifiable information.

Third-party links

Occasionally, at our discretion, we may include or offer third-party products or services on our website. These third-party sites have separate and independent privacy policies. We therefore have no responsibility or liability for the content and activities of these linked sites. Nonetheless, we seek to protect the integrity of our site and welcome any feedback about these sites.

Google

Google’s advertising requirements can be summed up by Google’s Advertising Principles. They are put in place to provide a positive experience for users.

We use Google AdSense Advertising on our website.

Google, as a third-party vendor, uses cookies to serve ads on our site. Google’s use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to our users based on previous visits to our site and other sites on the Internet. Users may opt-out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google Ad and Content Network privacy policy.

We have implemented the following:
  • Remarketing with Google AdSense

We along with third-party vendors, such as Google use first-party cookies (such as the Google Analytics cookies) and third-party cookies (such as the DoubleClick cookie) or other third-party identifiers together to compile data regarding user interactions with ad impressions and other ad service functions as they relate to our website.

Opting out:

Users can set preferences for how Google advertises to you using the Google Ad Settings page. Alternatively, you can opt out by visiting the Network Advertising initiative opt out page or permanently using the Google Analytics Opt Out Browser add on.

California Online Privacy Protection Act

CalOPPA is the first state law in the nation to require commercial websites and online services to post a privacy policy. The law’s reach stretches well beyond California to require a person or company in the United States (and conceivably the world) that operates websites collecting personally identifiable information from California consumers to post a conspicuous privacy policy on its website stating exactly the information being collected and those individuals with whom it is being shared, and to comply with this policy. – See more here.

According to CalOPPA we agree to the following:

Users can visit our site anonymously.

Once this privacy policy is created, we will add a link to it on our home page or as a minimum on the first significant page after entering our website.

Our Privacy Policy link includes the word ‘Privacy’ and can be easily be found on the page specified above.

Users will be notified of any privacy policy changes:

  • On our Privacy Policy Page

Users are able to change their personal information:

  • By emailing us
  • By calling us
  • By logging in to their account
How does our site handle do not track signals?

We honor do not track signals and do not track, plant cookies, or use advertising when a Do Not Track (DNT) browser mechanism is in place.

Does our site allow third-party behavioral tracking?

It’s also important to note that we do not allow third-party behavioral tracking

COPPA (Children Online Privacy Protection Act)

When it comes to the collection of personal information from children under 13, the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) puts parents in control. The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s consumer protection agency, enforces the COPPA Rule, which spells out what operators of websites and online services must do to protect children’s privacy and safety online.

We do not specifically market to children under 13.

Fair Information Practices

The Fair Information Practices Principles form the backbone of privacy law in the United States and the concepts they include have played a significant role in the development of data protection laws around the globe. Understanding the Fair Information Practice Principles and how they should be implemented is critical to comply with the various privacy laws that protect personal information.

In order to be in line with Fair Information Practices we will take the following responsive action, should a data breach occur:

We will notify the users via email

  • Within 7 business days

We also agree to the Individual Redress Principle, which requires that individuals have a right to pursue legally enforceable rights against data collectors and processors who fail to adhere to the law. This principle requires not only that individuals have enforceable rights against data users, but also that individuals have recourse to courts or government agencies to investigate and/or prosecute non-compliance by data processors.

CAN SPAM Act

The CAN-SPAM Act is a law that sets the rules for commercial email, establishes requirements for commercial messages, gives recipients the right to have emails stopped from being sent to them, and spells out tough penalties for violations.

We collect your email address in order to:
  • Send information, respond to inquiries, and/or other requests or questions.
  • Market to our mailing list or continue to send emails to our clients after the original transaction has occurred.
To be in accordance with CANSPAM we agree to the following:
  • NOT use false or misleading subjects or email addresses.
  • Identify the message as an advertisement in some reasonable way.
  • Include the physical address of our business or site headquarters.
  • Monitor third-party email marketing services for compliance, if one is used.
  • Honor opt-out/unsubscribe requests quickly.
  • Allow users to unsubscribe by using the link at the bottom of each email.
If at any time you would like to unsubscribe from receiving future emails:
  • Follow the instructions at the bottom of each email.

and we will promptly remove you from ALL correspondence.

Contacting Us

If there are any questions regarding this privacy policy please contact us.

Social Media Disclosure

The following describes the Social Media Disclosure for our website.

Social Media Issue

We live in an interesting time when privacy rights are championed alongside an unprecedented voluntary willingness of people to share their most intimate and superfluous life details with the world, even in places such as our website. While apparently benign on the surface, the dangers of unrestrained public disclosure of
sensitive information is beginning to surface. Key social media players are being sued for unauthorized or abusive use/misuse of personal information. Failure to protect and warn are likely going to be focal factors. Lawsuits are filed seeking damages for statements held to be responsible for people’s death or suicide. Bloggers presuming to operate under an unfettered freedom of speech or greater latitude offered to members of the press are losing civil cases for defamation, slander, libel, and so on.

As social media rapidly advances to allow more technologically sophisticated and easy dissemination, the simultaneous fallout of revelation without boundaries is mounting. Thus, a sober approach to the benefits of social media, while sidestepping the perils of imprudent disclosure, can facilitate an enjoyable online experience, without the consequences of excess, in settings such as our own website.

Presence/Scope of Social Media

You should assume that social media is in use on our website. A simple click of a button to endorse a person, product, or service is building a cumulative profile about you, which you should always assume can be discovered by others. Attempting to share a website with someone, whether by direct press of a button or else by email forwarding facilitated on a website, you should assume that this may not stop with the intended recipient, and that this can generate information about you that could be seen by a veritable infinite number of people. Such a domino effect could initiate right here on our website. Something as simple as a blog comment provides the opportunity for knee-jerk reactions that can become public and may not truly represent a position (at least in strength or severity) that you might hold after a period of more reasoned contemplation.

You should also note that the ease of accessing one site through the login credentials of another, or the use of a global login for access to multiple sites can accumulate a dossier on you and your online behavior that may reveal more information to unintended parties than you might realize or want. Any or all of these features could exist on our website at one time or another. These few examples illustrate some possible ways that social media can exist, though it is not an exhaustive list and new technologies will render this list outdated quickly. The objective is to realize the reach of social media, its widespread presence on websites in various forms (including this website), and develop a responsible approach to using it.

Protecting Others

You should recognize the fact that divulgences made in and on social media platforms on this website and others are rarely constrained just to you. Disclosures are commonly made about group matters that necessarily affect and impact other people. Other disclosures are expressly about third parties, sometimes with little discretion. What can appear funny in one moment can be tragic in the next. And a subtle “public” retaliation can have lifetime repercussions. Ideal use of social media on our website would confine your disclosures primarily to matters pertaining to you, not others. If in doubt, it’s best to err on the side of nondisclosure. It’s doubtful the disclosure is so meaningful that it cannot be offset by the precaution of acting to protect the best interests of someone who is involuntarily being exposed by your decision to disclose something on our website (or another).

Protecting Yourself

You should likewise pause to consider the long-term effects of a split-second decision to publicly share private information about yourself on our website. Opinions, likes, dislikes, preferences, and otherwise can change. Openly divulging perspectives that you hold today, may conflict with your developing views into the futures. Yet, the “new you” will always stand juxtaposed against the prior declarations you made that are now concretized as part of your public profile. While the contents of your breakfast may hold little long-term impact, other data likewise readily shared can have consequences that could conceivably impact your ability to obtain certain employment or hinder other life experiences and ambitions. As with sharing information about other people, extreme caution should be used before revealing information about yourself. If in doubt, it’s likely best not to do it. The short term gain, if any, could readily be outweighed by later consequences. Finally, you should note that we are not responsible for removing content once shared, and we may not be able to do so.

Restrictions on Use of Social Media Data

You, as a visitor to our website, are not permitted to “mine” social media or other platforms contained herein for personal information related to others. Even where people have publicly displayed data, you should not construe that as though you have the liberty to capture, reproduce, or reuse that information. Any use of social media or related platforms on our website are for interactive use only, relevant only during the website visit.

Accuracy of Social Media Data

As any social media platform is built on user-generated content, you should consider this fact in seeking to determine the authenticity of anything you read. We are not responsible for verifying any user-generated content for accuracy. A best practices policy would be to view all such content as strictly opinion, not fact.

Potential Issues of Liability

You should also be mindful of the fact that your words could trigger liability for harm caused to others. While you have the right to free speech, you do not have the right to damage other people. Under basic principles of tort law, you are always responsible, personally, for situations where either:

1. You were required to act, but did not (i.e. – some “duty of care”)

2. You were required to refrain from acting, but did not (i.e. – slander, defamation, etc.)

These “sins of omission and commission” could cause problems for you, irrespective of whether you assert you are conducting business under the guise of one or more business entities. Illegal and unethical conduct, when done in the name of a corporation or LLC, is still illegal and unethical conduct. As it is rarely part of a business plan to engage in illegal and unethical conduct, you are doubtfully operating in any official capacity, but rather, perhaps, leveraging that capacity to effectuate personal wrongdoing. You should consult a licensed attorney if you wish legal advice as to the (potential) ramification of your situation or legal problems stemming from this website or another.

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